And another thing

Diversity: A Bad Bargain

The James G. Martin Center has just published my review of The Diversity Bargain: And Other Dilemmas of Race, Admissions, and Meritocracy at Elite Universities, a new book based on extensive interviews with “whites” and “students of color” at Harvard and Brown that I describe as “unwittingly and depressingly useful.”    

Charlottesville

By now I’m sure you’re all sick of Charlottesville — or as I now say, “Charlottesville,” because this nice, formerly small “academical village” (Jefferson’s term) has ceased to be a place and become something of an iconic event, rather like the Edmund Pettus bridge between Selma and Montgomery. I know I’m sick of it, and […]

The Seventh Recycling Of July 4

Four years ago I posted the following recycled July 4th piece, linking earlier iterations. Sadly, it still seems relevant, and so here it is again. Here’s my July 4 post from a year ago, which seem worth posting again (and again … and again): Here’s how I began a July 4th post two years ago: On three […]

Re-Educating “White-Identified” Faculty At San Jose State

See my recent short piece on Minding The Campus for a discussion of how Mao-like cultural revolution has come to campus in the form of “professional development” seminars and training aimed at promoting “racial literacy” by rooting out racial bias (implicit and otherwise) in “white-identified” faculty.

The New York Times On What – And What Is Not – Fit To Print

Since 1896 “All The News That’s Fit To Print” has been the motto of the New York Times. Its recent publication of an OpEd, “What ‘Snowflakes’ Get Right About Free Speech,” by Ulrich Baer, vice provost for faculty, arts, humanities, and diversity and professor of comparative literature at New York University, suggests that the Times’ view […]

#BlackLivesMatter Must Matter To Stanford

By now you’re familiar with Ziad Ahmed, the son of a hedge fund manager and graduate of Princeton Day School (tuition: PreK through Fourth Grade: $28,230; Fifth and Sixth Grades: $33,010; Seventh through Twelfth Grade: $34,600 per year) who was just admitted to Stanford after submitting an application essay —  answering the question, “What matters to you, […]

Hinky Hasen

Prof. Richard Hasen, widely regarded (especially by Democrats) as an expert on election law, has a recent OpEd in the Washington Post demonstrating that his expertise does not extend to affirmative action. His argument is that Judge Neil Gorsuch is an “affirmative action baby,” that he “got where he is because of a form of […]

Klueless [sic] Kristof

These days it is almost impossible to parody progressives, because they unwittingly parody themselves so much more effectively than would-be critics ever could. Take Nicholas Kristof of  the New York Times (please!). Here he is today, writing “My Most Unpopular Idea: Be Nice to Trump Voters.” Suggesting that “Maybe we all need a little more […]

Race, Sex Discrimination Against University Administrators

Here is the lede from my recently posted Minding The Campus piece on paycheck unfairness: The College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR) has just published an extensive research report on pay and representation of racial and ethnic minorities in higher education administrative positions that ought to be a bombshell, documenting as it does widespread […]

Feminist Math

I encourage you to take a look at my short piece on “Another Breakthrough In Feminist Mathematics” that appeared today on Minding The Campus. Roger Clegg wrote to ask whether my daughter, Jessie the physicist, had helped with it. I replied: ” Alas, no, or it would have been better. But I’ll send it to her […]