Dishonoring Martin Luther King, Jr.

One of the saddest commentaries on the sorry state of “civil rights” today — or at least how the straggling remnant of the civil rights movement and their liberal camp followers view civil rights today — is that Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, most powerful and emblematic utterance — that he looks forward to the day when his children will be judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin — has now become uncomfortably controversial among those who claim to honor him.

“Yet today, 50 years after King shared this vision during his most famous speech,” the Associated Press purports to report, “there is considerable disagreement over what it means.” Actually, that’s wrong. There can be no reasonably disagreement over what it means. The disagreement is over only whether that principle should be honored or rejected.

On King’s Birthday in 2008 I wrote:

Rather than attempting to say something original on Martin Luther King’s birthday, let me instead point to three posts I originally wrote — herehere, and here.

If I attempted to write something new today, it would wind up doing no more than repeating what’s in these three.

Alas, that’s still true. So I’ll make a deal with you: I’ll refrain from saying anything more here if you’ll go back and read (or even better, re-read) those three old posts.

O.K. I’ve now kept my part of this bargain.

 

Say What? (2)

  1. B.B. January 20, 2013 at 11:27 pm | | Reply

    How does it honor Martin Luther King to dishonestly prop him up as a proponent of color-blindness by selectively quoting him? In fact maybe we should reconsider why we would want to honor him in the first place.

    http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig/epstein9.html

  2. Cobra January 21, 2013 at 7:37 pm | | Reply

    [blockquote]@B.B.–In fact maybe we should reconsider why we would want to honor him in the first place.[/blockquote]

    Who is “we?”

    [blockquote]@John–The disagreement is over only whether that principle should be honored or rejected.[/blockquote]

    There are so many great quotes from that speech…including:

    “It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.”

    –Cobra

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